September 15, 2013 ~ The ‘Hysterical’ as Historical

streetsigns

Last week’s post spoke of Yellow Light Communication, an in between stage where we may choose to slow down and take a look around before we gauge whether it’s prudent to proceed.

slow-sign

One strategy during this pause may be to employ what Robert Gonzales refers to as mourning-&-beauty-of-needs process, noting that as the saying goes, often if it’s hysterical, then it’s historical (or how to deescalate by decoupling the present from the past).

side-view-mirror

Sunday, September 15, 2013 ~ The ‘Hysterical’ as Historical

“Self-compassion is approaching ourselves, our inner experience with spaciousness, with the quality of allowing which has a quality of gentleness. Instead of our usual tendency to want to get over something, to fix it, to make it go away, the path of compassion is totally different. Compassion allows.” ~ Robert Gonzales

Clarity, Compassion & Empowerment

Transforming the Pain of Unmet Needs to the Beauty of the Needs

By engaging with the process of Transforming the Pain of Unmet Needs to the Beauty of the Needs, three qualities result — clarity, compassion and empowerment: 1) a felt-sense and cognitive clarity that stems from discerning the quality of our thoughts — the simmering stew of evaluations/judgments/interpretations — distinguishing reactive thinking from what observably happened and our interior experience; 2) from this clarity ensues perspective, a spaciousness or compassion (the capacity to mourn, resulting in a more open mind and tender heart); 3) finally, and perhaps paradoxically, from this practice of bearing witness to our thoughts and emotions (energy-in-motion) comes a kind of organic capacity to yield, an attunement to the vulnerability, both in ourselves and others, from which strength may arise, empowering our conduct, in the truest sense of the term.

clarity

“As my exploration of Nonviolent Communication and spirituality deepened over the years, what has emerged in me is a clarity about ways to cultivate a daily practice of living compassion – day to day, moment by moment — with ourselves and in relationships with others.  It is a practice of compassionately embracing all of life.” ~ Robert Gonzales

be-obscure

Practices: Compassionately Embracing & Transformation Process

Skills For Compassion – Robert Gonzales

Summary Notes from 5 Day workshop with Robert Gonzales

See more re: Robert Gonzales at Living-Compassion.org

Inspiration from Stephen Schwartz

If you look at these oak trees surrounding this house… one can only notice, in an exploration, that they arose from a seed, and that there was nothing in that seed – at least nothing that could be directly experienced – which would give an indication that such a mighty form would arise like that – such a great and beautiful form would stretch towards the heavens. It is as if within that seed lay a kind of restlessness, a kind of ferment, a kind of aching; and out of that aching, out of that restlessness, something had to break open – and in the breaking open, direction, in space and time was given to this tree. 

All of our emotions, really, are this same kind of ferment, this same kind of creative restlessness which is emerging from a silence and going toward an as yet unknown goal. And we are the seed, our life is the seed, and at various times there are boundaries that don’t feel good to have, especially when something seems to be fuming and pulsating so much of the time.

We are conscious beings. We are conscious seeds and we can come back to the restlessness; we can make a choice; we can discover the energetic element within that restlessness. We can, in a sense, cooperate in the barrier walls of the seed falling apart and giving rise to new life. This is the possible beauty of our experience here; but all of this in the context of a silence, an unknown.

An example of both 1) the Robert Gonzales process of mourning-&-the-beauty-of-the-needs (i.e. the transcendent beauty of the new tower beside the immanence of mourning in a memorial honoring the footprints of the former towers) as well as 2) placing that which is emotionally charged in a broader, historical context:

Sting – Fragile (September 11, 2001 in Tuscany, Italy)

If blood will flow when flesh and steel are one
Drying in the color of the evening sun
Tomorrow’s rain will wash the stains away
But something in our minds will always stay...

One World Trade Center
OneWorldTradeCenter.jpg

Witness the phoenix-like rebirth of the World Trade Center, including the installation of its spire, bringing it to a symbolic height of 1776 feet.  Hundreds of thousands of high definition images were captured over the past nine years (2004 – 2013) and hand-edited for this special time-lapse movie.

See also:  WTC Tribute & “Why the Towers Fell” (Nova PBS)

ground-zero-reflecting-pool

Ground Zero Reflecting Pools in the Footprints of Twin Towers

The Mirror of 9/11 

THE LAST SEPTEMBER 11

by Ariel Dorfman (penned October 3rd 2001)

I have been through this before.

During the last 28 years, Tuesday, Sept. 11, has been a date of mourning, for me and millions of others, ever since that day in 1973 when Chile lost its democracy in a military coup, that day when death irrevocably entered our lives and changed us forever. And now, almost three decades later, the malignant gods of random history have wanted to impose upon another country that dreadful date, again a Tuesday, once again an 11th of September filled with death…(continues)

purplish-hued-dc-reflecting-pool

Chile Marks 40th Anniversary of U.S.-Backed Coup via Democracy Now!

As the United States marked the 12th anniversary of the attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon, Chile commemorated what is known as the first 9/11 — the September 11, 1973 — the U.S.-backed coup that overthrew President Salvador Allende. In a ceremony at the presidential palace where her father was killed, Allende’s daughter, Chilean Senator Isabel Allende, said “truth and justice” is the only path to healing from the coup’s lingering damage.

Isabel Allende: “Only truth and justice will allow us to come back together as a country. And the ethical values and the values that never again break the democracy, never again have a coup, never to break constitutional order again, never again to hunt someone down because of their beliefs, never again torture or state terrorism.”

As has been highlighted before on this blog here, September 11th — in this instance the fortieth anniversary of the 1973 Chilean Coup — could be viewed as yet another example of the sometimes eerie symmetries of the so-called ‘hysterical’ (catalysts which evoke overwhelming visceral emotions) as often times being unwitting historical repetitions and how tragic events may be amplified when it occurs as a déjà vu, to those such as the widow of U.S. Journalist Charles Horman , the family of slain singer Víctor Jara and the renowned writer Ariel Dorfman.

Sting – They Dance Alone (HD) Live in Viña del mar 2011

9/11: The Day Everything Changed, in Chile

Kissinger Meets With Kerry on Chilean Coup’s 40-Year Mark – Democracy Now!

As Chileans marked the 40th anniversary of their 9/11, the leading U.S. official involved in the 1973 U.S.-backed coup, Henry Kissinger, was in Washington meeting with Secretary of State John Kerry. The State Department says Kissinger was summoned for his expertise on Russia before Kerry’s meeting today on Syria with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov. As then-National Security Adviser, Kissinger oversaw the Nixon administration’s backing of the Chilean military’s ouster of Allende and subsequent mass killings and torture to cement its rule.

dc-reflecting-pool

Forty years after Pinochet’s coup, a historic presidential campaign has revived debates about his dictatorship—and Washington’s role in it. – Peter Kornbluh

Translated by Joan Jara. Read by Adrian Mitchell.
From the album Manifiesto [Canciones Póstumas]

FYI ~ 

 Cache on 1973 Chilean Coup via Democracy Now!

reflection

[ri-flek-shuhn]

noun

1.

the act of reflecting or the state of being reflected.
2.

an image; representation; counterpart.
3.

a fixing of the thoughts on something; careful consideration.
4.

a thought occurring in consideration or meditation.
5.

an unfavorable remark or observation.

national-9-11-memorial-horizontal-gallery

This entry was posted in Practice Resources - Gonzales, Taking on the World - Social Change Agency, What's Up Next? and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

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