Tab-II

STREET GIRAFFE

(Provisional Outline)

II. 

Self-Connection Exercise/Opening Meditation [OFNR]

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Cartoon

More irreverent NVC cartoons: http://anvc.svenhartenstein.de

I ~  Self-Connection Exercise/Opening Meditation [OFNR]

Practice: Meditating on Needs

ZENVC.org’s Yoga of Self-Connection

Learning MaterialsZENVC

Developing Interior Mindfulness of NVC Consiousness (&/or ‘Stealth NVC’)

The self is an oral society in which the present is constantly running a dialogue with the past and the future inside of one skin.
David Antin

Nonviolent Communication: A Selfconnection meditative exercise

View Manske videos on YouTube.com

See also:  Mary Mackenzie’s Daily Needs Meditation

Why meditate on Needs?

FYI:  Shifting to Needs Consciousness

A giraffe

BayNVC’s Facets of Self-Connection*

Selfempathy exercise NVC Nonviolent Communication – YouTube

Practice ~ Meditating on Needs:

Dialogue with Giraffe (2001), 24 X 20 (with border, total size: 30 X 22), polaroid

[PDF] UNIVERSAL HUMAN NEEDSBayNVC

Via Kashtan’s Wanting Fully Without Attachment | Tikkun Magazine (excerpt)

If you have ever participated in meditation of any kind, you probably know that most forms of meditation involve returning attention to an object of focus whenever attention wanders. Some meditation practices focus on the breath (many forms of Buddhist and Yogic meditation), some on certain bodily sensations (some forms of Vipassana meditation, for example), some on specific words (mantras in transcendental meditation), and some on specific sequences of ideas and images (some forms of Jewish meditation).

In an entirely similar manner, you can develop a meditation practice that focuses on connecting with needs. The object of focus is the line “I have a need for ____.” Just as with any other form of meditation, your mind will likely wander. You will likely hear internal responses, such as: “But this need cannot be met; why bother?” or “Yeah, but this person is not going to change,” or “I should just grow up and get over this petty wish of mine,” or “This is not just about some personal need of mine. This is about everyone’s right to dignity.” The aim of the practice is to bring your attention back to the need you are meditating on—without harshness. Rather than punishing yourself for wandering, just gently bring your attention back.

Encountering and connecting with needs is different from naming them as checklist items. Whenever we do this practice, we can take a moment to breathe, to really experience the flavor of that need being inside of us—exactly what it feels like, what the sensations of having this need are, and what this need means to us.

BayNVC’s Facets of Self-Connection*:

Needs: Facets of Self-Connection

Purpose: This guided reflection is intended to support you in experiencing a
variety of ways to connect with your needs, which you can use at any time in your
daily life. People resonate differently with these different ways. You may want to
explore each of these to see which support you in gaining more self-connection
and inner freedom. You can use these reflections as a series or separately from
each other.

1. Focus your attention on a need that is not met to your satisfaction in
your life. Put your focus specifically on the unmet quality of this need. You
can say to yourself: “My need for ____ is not met,” and repeat this phrase
until you are fully connected with the experience of the unmet need. (You
might want to close your eyes and focus inwardly while you do this.) What
sensations do you notice in your body? What feelings arise?

2. Now shift your attention to the need itself. Not to the idea of having the
need met, but to the need itself; to the fact of having a need. You can say to
yourself: “I have a need for _____,” and repeat this phrase until you are fully
connected with the experience of having the need. (You might want to close
your eyes and focus inwardly while you do this.) What sensations do you
notice in your body? What feelings arise?

3. Now shift your attention to the met quality of the need. What is it like for
you when this need is met? You can imagine this need met, and say to
yourself: “My need for _____ is met,” and repeat this phrase until you are
fully connected with the experience of having this need met. (You might
want to close your eyes and focus inwardly while you do this.) What
sensations do you notice in your body? What feelings arise?

4. Lastly, shift your attention to the need as a presence you want to
encounter (another meaning of “meet”). This is similar to focusing on the
need without it being met or unmet, but may be experienced differently.
Focus on what it is like to meet this need in the sense of encountering it fully.
You might say to yourself: “Hello _____. Welcome,” and repeat this phrase
until you are fully connected with the experience of having encountering this
need. (You might want to close your eyes and focus inwardly while you do
this.) What sensations do you notice in your body? What feelings arise?

5. Note any insight from the shift in focus, and or any needs met by the
experience.

6. Consider: when would you want to engage with each of these different
focuses on your needs? How might each serve you? What needs would you
want to meet through this focus?

7. Do you have any requests of yourself?


Wanting Fully Without Attachment | Tikkun Magazine

Source Citation

Kashtan, Miki. 2010. Wanting Fully Without Attachment. Tikkun 25(1): 39.

Kashtan, certified trainer with the Center for Nonviolent Communication and co-founder of Bay Area NVC, offers NVC workshops and retreats, mediation, facilitation, coaching, and organizational training internationally. For more information, visit www.baynvc.org or email nvc@baynvc.org.

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